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P3 survey: 44% of U.S. patients receive inadequate relief of moderate-to-severe acute pain

September 13, 2019

The study also found that people were more emotionally aroused just before casting their ballot. "Since we do not like to feel 'stressed out'," adds Prof. Cohen, "It is unclear whether this pressure on Election Day can influence people and cause them not to vote at all. Impact on voter turnout is particularly important given that the stress levels rise if our preferred party or candidate for whom we want to vote is not popular in the polls and projections."

The researchers emphasized that their findings are only a first step in understanding the relationship between stress at a biological level and voting, and that their study did not examine -- and therefore did not find -- if high levels of cortisol affect choice. However, evidence about the decision making processes and biological processes in the body should be explored in future research. When endocrinology and democracy collide: Emotions, cortisol and voting at national elections

Source: American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev